ImagesDescription & My Contributions
Qatar Social Game

Prototype spaceship designs (Mental Ray). Left-most design was implemented in the final game.

Qatar Social Game

Social area featuring holodeck table with VFX shaders & particles (Unity).

Qatar Social Game

Students playing the game & providing feedback for user-centred design approach (Doha, Qatar).

Qatar Social Game

Prototype character designs (ZBrush).

Qatar Social Game

Texture sheets demonstrating stylised visual design of environment.

Qatar Social Game

Quick concept sketch illustrating future add-on features for the game.

Employer: Imperial College London

Imperial College were contracted to develop and research a weight-loss programme for 8-12 year old Qatari children in Doha, delivered in conjunction with Qatar University and Leeds Metropolitan University. This had a real world component at a sports facility in Qatar, where children were given training in nutrition, lifestyle and sport, followed by after-school clubs for 3 months and then online support during the summer months where they would attend ‘virtual’ sessions (from their home computers) designed to reinforce the lessons learned. (Qatar National Health Strategy article)

The brief called for an engaging environment in which groups could meet with a trainer/facilitator, and play games as well as rehearse what they had learned. I was engaged to develop the virtual environment and character artwork from concept through to implementation, working alongside a programmer and the research team. Since male and female teams would compete with one another yet needed to remain segregated by gender for cultural reasons I proposed a space theme where the individual teams would meet in their own spaceship which effectively isolated them from one another. This enabled me to develop several space-themed game concepts in both 2D and 3D.

Course facilitators had administrative control over the virtual environments and could trigger games to be played on demand during the sessions. A reward system (with mini-games) was used to incentivise the children’s participation. The reward system enabled children to customise their character (avatar) by unlocking more clothing and accessory options. The game was tested with children attending a number of schools in Doha.